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Volume 42 – Number 4

May 2011

 


'Eight Views' Paintings at The Cleveland Museum of Art
The Battle of Ichinotani
Two Japanese Maps at the Art Gallery of South Australia

Korean Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Portrait of Qianlong's Heir
'Global Tree Project' in Cincinnati
In Conversation: Edmund Lewis and Paul Moss


Cover: Detail of Tale of the Heike: The Battle of Ichinotani
Keichô period, early 17th century (c. 1596-1615)
Six-panel folding screen, ink, colours and gold on paper
Height 169.8 cm, length 372.3 cm
Private collection, Japan


As we go to press with our May issue, it is cherry blossom time in Japan, but there are no sakura festivities this year. Instead funds have been directed towards the earthquake and tsunami relief efforts. Likewise in Washington DC, funds raised by the organizers of the National Cherry Blossom Festival are being distributed by the Red Cross; and in New York, Japan Society’s fund (www.japansociety.org/earthquake), launched the day after the quake, raised some US$3.28 million by the end of March. This issue, with its emphasis on the imagination, vision and accomplishments of Japanese artists from the 16th century to the modern day, is dedicated to the people of Japan. 

Seunghye Sun, Matthew McKelway and Russell Kelty discuss, respectively, the evolution of ‘Eight Views’ paintings in Japan, a previously unpublished screen painting, and two early Japanese maps. Patricia Graham reviews Shinji Turner-Yamamoto’s installations in Cincinnati, and Aaron Rio explains how he had an opportunity to view the Gitter-Yelen exhibition prior to the devastation.

In addition, Jane Portal introduces Korean highlights at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, while Kristina Kleutghen analyses a scenic illusion portrait from the Palace Museum, Beijing; and Edmund Lewis and Paul Moss share their views on Chinese and Japanese art.

 

 
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