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Volume 33 – Number 2

Feb 2002

 


Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Art and Cultures

Detail of the last will and testament of Emperor Gotoba with handprints, 1239
Handscroll, ink and red seal-ink on paper
Minase shrine, Osaka prefecture
National Treasure

The Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures was founded in January 1999 through the generosity of Sir Robert and Lady Sainsbury, and is associated with the University of East Anglia in Norwich and the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. The Institute's mission is to create a network of alliances among researchers and to disseminate their work through special projects, symposia and publications.
 
In addition to four articles by members of the Institute, Dame Elizabeth Esteve-Coll interviewed Lady Sainsbury for this issue. Nicole Collidge Rousmaniere focuses on the collecting of Japanese ceramics by Augustus Wollaston Franks, a Keeper at the British Museum from 1866 to 1896. Simon Kaner's article provides an overview of recent advances in understanding the contexts within which Jomon pottery was produced. John T. Carpenter examines how painted portraits and calligraphic 'self-portraits' reveal the unique personality and tragic story of Emperor Gotoba. Timon Screech discusses the role of textiles in trade and diplomatic exchanges between Japan and Europe during the Edo period.
 
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